Author Archives: Jade Stroud-Watts

One of the most impressive scholars our School has produced since 1886 is Professor Sir Walter Murdoch, who was Dux of our School in 1889. He pursued an academic career at Melbourne University and then, for most of his career, in Western Australia, where a university now bears his name. Given his eminent academic career it is appropriate that a new research and development arm in our School will be called ‘The Walter Murdoch Centre’. Educational thinking and practice is moving very quickly at the moment, and the implications of technology and how it can be used to help teaching and learning are only just now beginning to be understood. In order for us to keep up with the rate of change, and also to help prepare our students for the world they will enter after school, we need to devote some resources to research and innovation, and the Murdoch Centre will provide these.
Declan and his classmate Liam Brady, also 15, have been studying Indonesian since Year 7. Although neither of them have decided whether they will continue studying the language until Year 12, both chose the language to learn more about one of Australia's nearest neighbours. "It's interesting to … [gain] insight into their way of life and a bit more history about them," Liam says. "There's a lot of different opportunities [that] can involve the use of the language. "If you wanted to join the army, or certain other jobs that involve interactions with other countries, you need to be able to speak a second language."
Our Year 11 students recently participated in a one-day conference called BODi Day. The title is an acronym for 'By Our Deeds: Inquiry'. There were sessions on healthy eating and physical well-being, emotional self-control, mindfulness, yoga and meditation, social connectedness and integrity. In the evening, parents and students were invited back to the school to discuss the nature of ‘meaningful relationships’. The focus of this conference though, was on a couple of big questions: what does it mean to be a ‘good man’, and how can we find happiness and contentment in our lives? Such questions are central to all of us as we navigate through difficult times, and are surely as important in education as Mathematics or History.